Brigandine: The Legend of Forsena [1998] ANALYSIS

10 thoughts on “Brigandine: The Legend of Forsena [1998] ANALYSIS”

  1. would love to play it again! too bad my brigandine cd doesn’t work anymore. well the only drawback there is the ugly 3d battle scenes and summoning. i wish they would made a seq with more heroes and monster classes

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    1. It is hard to find a playable solution, but not impossible. Brigandine would be a fine addition to the PSN store. Will SONY do it? It would certainly help many who enjoyed this game play it again.

      You are right about the CGI cut scenes. Very dated. A skip option should be added for any new release. Good point about the classes. We found the monster class upgrades a lot of fun, and in light of the Pokemon craze, perhaps ahead of their time.

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      1. Hey, it’s never too late at Play What You Like. Here we have an ongoing exploration of this fun genre.

        Thanks for stopping by and for the tip regarding the animations. We updated the point in the analysis for clarification.

        Firebird!

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  2. I would like to share with you the grassroots project Wills and Wonders. Wills and Wonders takes the basic concept that Brigandine had and expands on it; Providing faster gameplay with even more strategy, while staying true to large scale hexagonal turn based combat.
    See more at Steam Greenlight
    http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=379571772
    and my Facebook page
    http://www.facebook.com/pages/On-The-Wall-Entertainment/1072336762793533?ref=hl

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    1. Your game project looks interesting. You know we understand what it takes to make a game. Hexagonal systems are unusual and have their own challenges.

      We don’t always analyze big budget SRPG titles. Right now we are playing Tactics Maiden for android. So who knows, if your game gets completed we might see here at Play What You Like. Best of luck to you.

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  3. A Playstation store add would be great. Very doubtful that will ever happen though. I still play this game on occasion. I love the transformation of even the lowly characters. Gives you a reason to care about them and try to keep them alive. I also like the quest option at the beginning of your turn. Where you can send a knight, usually a weaker knight, out on a quest. These quest seem random, with some reaping a reward and some with even death. It was always nice to have a Knight return with a new, powerful knight, or creature when returning from a quest.

    I love most every thing about this game. There are a few things that I found discouraging though. 1) the hit success ratio for your units, especially the golems/giants. They seemed to miss their attacks all the time. They also seemed to miss more at the end of the game when fighting the higher up Generals. Almost like the more the odds were in your favor, the more units missed their attacks. 2) The lack of a 2-player versus. Most the time these games do not have that option, so why does it upset me? Because the Japanese release Grandmaster edition you can do just that. You can play two player. You can also play as the main antagonist as a playable faction. I wish Atlus would of released that version over in the states as well. 3) The lack of a really good story. The story is basically non existent. This is not a deal breaker, just something I wish would of been more of a focus for Atlus. The leveling up system almost makes up for the lack of story though. Helps you care about the characters, even the lowly ones, when they really don’t have a back story.

    Everything else, I love about the game. Solid 9 out of 10. If you have a way to play Brigindine you owe it to yourself to try the game. The game is pretty pricey now, so a Playstation store release would be highly appreciated, but I would not hold my breath for that to happen.

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    1. What a thoughtful and knowledgeable comment, TruMcFly. It is clear to us that you are well acquainted with this game, and have a great memory!

      First, your point about the quest system is well taken. This is an area of the game we did not explore fully. Your comments bring to light this potentially fun-adding aspect. We say that knowing the robust quest system in Suikoden Tactics, for example, was one of the most enjoyable parts of that game.

      We are going to modify our analysis to note the quest system, and if we replay Brigandine, we will explore it thoroughly. We are especially impressed that a unit could die on a quest. That raises the stakes and makes your choice of who to send “for real.” And possible rewards of powerful units sounds better to us, for the risk, than some random item.

      As for attacks that miss: There was an SRPG that we played where misses were an issue, but we cannot recall which. Front Mission 4 perhaps? Anyway, in an SRPG world, where each turn is key, a miss can unbalance things almost as much as going twice in a row. The latter being a real drawback in, for example, Advance Wars Duel Strike.

      As we mentioned, we agree with you regarding the story. A serious game like Brigandine would have benefited greatly from a deeper one. Even the more juvenile and less serious Drone Tactics had a deeper story. But a good SRPG doesn’t absolutely have to have one. But we are making a distinction between Strategy RPG and Turn-Based Strategy like Advance Wars, which was good with only minimal narrative.

      A PlayStation store release of the grand master edition would be sweet indeed. Head to head, real-person SRPG play was uncommon for the era, and it would be interesting to try out.

      Thanks for commenting.

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